Do I have a good chance?

DETAILS

After serving 5 months in jail for misdemeanor thefts in which I broke my probation, I was released on bond pending 4 felony thefts. The judge asked me to get a job and stop re-offending. I signed a plea of 10 years oppose probation. My initial court date was reset so that I could bring more restitution funds. I owe about $56,000. The judge told me to that if I wanted any shot at deferred adjudication, to bring more funds. I was reset for 30 days. The next appearance my attorney asked for additional time as I had just started working. It was granted. I return to court Monday and I have a total of $5,800 originally I only had $500. This is $5,300 more. I’ve been working and have the ability to repay this restitution. Does this look good? What usually goes on in cases like this?

Additional information
The job I have is steady and I’m enrolling for school also. I’m only 23 years old and have just made a lot of errors on the past. I know I can repay the rest on probation. What input can you give me?

ANSWER

Since you are working with an attorney who is probably familiar with the judge and DA in this jurisdiction, I would give your attorney a call and ask him/her what to expect.

It certainly sounds like you have made a good faith effort and if I were the judge I would certainly give you more time to pay additional money and give you an opportunity at deferred.

I have seen many individuals get more time from the judge in light of a substantial payment like yours.

In the end, if you are incarcerated you will never be able to make restitution payments (and the judge is fully aware of this). So the best thing to do is bring in as much restitution money as possible (which you have done) to show you are serious about getting your life back on track.