Juvinale sex offender, now 24 yrs old, married. was arrested while sitting with wife under pavillion at a small park, what now?

DETAILS

as a juvinale, he was charged as a sex offender and remanded in doc from the age of 13 until 4 mo befor his 21 birthday he is now 24 and married. while sitting under a local parks pavillion, some distance away from the play ground, an officer randomly ran the vehicle plates where they had parked the car and proceeded to where they were sitting and arrested him on the spot. There were no kids in this park, and the wife has no drivers liscense and can not drive the vehicle and was further informed that her husband may be used as an example for a new offender law that he was not made aware of. At his last status check he was told that his juvinale record would be expunged and he would be able to have a normal life. what can be done and how bad is this?

ANSWER

This is a very serious situation. It would be best to contact a criminal defense attorney who works in your jurisdiction and has handled sex offense cases. Either he was arrested for a new law violation or he was arrested for violating a term of his supervised release. You state that he was at a park, and after handling many of these cases, I am guessing that he was not supposed to be there because that is where children frequently play. However, if he wasn’t given notice, there could be some issues to litigate. Further, if this supposed “New law” just took effect, then maybe it isn’t applicable to him.

All of these issues need to be addressed by a local criminal defense attorney. If he can not afford one, check out the public defender’s office (or in some states, it is called court appointed counsel). In any event, either retain an attorney or request a court appointed attorney immediately.

Further, do not make any statements to police. Do not agree to an interview or agree to talk on the phone to police. The police may offer to “clear things up” if you talk to them. Don’t fall for this. Ultimately, they will try to build a case against you and almost always the statements from the defendant help the prosecutor.